Considerations on the Propriety of Imposing Taxes in the Colonies, for the Purpose of Raising a Revenue, by Act of Parliament. Daniel Dulany.
Considerations on the Propriety of Imposing Taxes in the Colonies, for the Purpose of Raising a Revenue, by Act of Parliament
Annapolis Mayor Daniel Dulany's Brilliant Argument against the Stamp Act of 1765

Considerations on the Propriety of Imposing Taxes in the Colonies, for the Purpose of Raising a Revenue, by Act of Parliament

London: J. Almon, 1766. Second edition. Disbound. Octavo. [vi], 81, [1] pages. Very good. Some light foxing to external leaves. Apparently removed from a larger volume of pamphlets, with some binding remnants along spine. Remains soundly sewn as its own piece.

Daniel Dulany's highly influential pamphlet in opposition to the Stamp Act of 1765. He argued that while inhabitants of England were properly represented by members of Parliament (elected by other inhabitants of England), the same was not be true for those living in the North American colonies, where the interests were too far removed from those of any members of Parliament. Dulany's argument essentially gave birth to the popular political slogan "No taxation without representation."

Dulany argued with such legal acumen and literary power that colonists instantly found their own disgruntled opinions brilliantly articulated here. The pamphlet was said to have moulded the opinions of the likes of William Pitt.

Originally published in Annapolis in late 1765, this is the second London edition of 1766 printed at the direction of Benjamin Franklin (see Benjamin Franklin's Letters to the Press, 1758-1775).

ADAMS 11g; SABIN 21170.


Item #841

Price: $1,000

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