The Republican Party Vindicated--the Demands of the South Explained. Speech of Hon. Abraham Lincoln, of Illinois, at the Cooper Institute, N. Y. City, February 27, 1860. Americana, Abraham Lincoln.
The Republican Party Vindicated--the Demands of the South Explained. Speech of Hon. Abraham Lincoln, of Illinois, at the Cooper Institute, N. Y. City, February 27, 1860

The Republican Party Vindicated--the Demands of the South Explained. Speech of Hon. Abraham Lincoln, of Illinois, at the Cooper Institute, N. Y. City, February 27, 1860

(s.l.): (s.n.), [1860]. Pamphlet. Octavo. 16 pages. Near Fine. Printed in double columns. The four sheets that make up this 16 page pamphlet have never been bound, but are instead held together with two old straight pins at top and bottom of centerfold. Pamphlet was folded twice horizontally, probably to fit a vest pocket, and there is a bit of rubbing along those creases on the outside of the last leaf but without loss of text. Additionally, there are some mild brown stains to last few pages and a couple of old stray ink doodles in top margin of last page.

An early post-nomination printing of what is arguably Lincoln's greatest speech. In it he makes a brilliant argument that a majority of the nation's founders intended that slavery not be allowed to expand into new territories as the country grew. The research he had to conduct on their voting records and and documented comments is impressive, even before you recall that he did it from the frontier. His logic and reasoning are stunning. Prior to this Cooper Union speech, Lincoln had a vague reputation in the Republican establishment as a decent stump speaker and debater from "out west." This speech, delivered to a skeptical New York audience, immediately changed him into a viable national presidential candidate. Uncommon and important artifact from Lincoln's first campaign for President of the United States. MONAGHAN 54.

Item #11675

Price: $500

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